The Dark Side Of Illegal Immigration
The Dark Side Of Illegal Immigration
Facts, Figures And Statistics On Illegal Immigration

Immigration Facts, Figures And Addendum

ADDENDUM

(Presented verbatim but I do not have the source for this so I can not vouch for the veracity of the statements and I have not checked the accuracy and/or credibility of the references)

Some other things you probably didn't know:

  • Cities that receive the largest numbers of immigrants also have twice the unemployment rate, 40% more people living in poverty, and 40% more serious crime per capita than cities with few or no immigrant arrivals. (1)
  • Some 11.2 million immigrants arrived in the USA between 1990 and 2000. This, added to the 6.4 million children born to immigrants living in the USA, accounts for almost 70% of the US population growth in the past decade. (3) 
  • Immigrants now represent more than one in every tenUS residents, the highest percentage in 70 years. (4) 
  • Over the next 50 years, the US Census Bureau projects that immigration will cause the population of the United States to increase from its present 270 million to more than 400 million. (9) 
  • Nationwide, 33% of Third World immigrants who settled in the USA since 1990, live in poverty, nearly three times the rate for US-born natives. Some 36% of immigrants failed to finish high school, more than double the percentage for US-born nationals. (12) 
  • About 15% of US citizens fall below the poverty line,compared to 29% of non-citizens. About 11% of non-citizens have incomes less than 50% of the poverty line, compared to 6% of citizens. (13) 
  • The number of impoverished people in the USA's immigrant-headed households nearly tripled from 2.7 million in 1979 to 7.7 million in 1997. (14)  During that same period, the number of poor households headed by immigrants increased by 123% while the number of immigrant households increased by 68%. (15)  
  • According to Forbes Magazine, a greater proportion of the US population is currently living in poverty than what was the case three decades ago. (16)  According to Forbes Magazine, Significantly, Hispanics accounted for a statistical 0% of the nation's poor in 1959. (17) 
  • Hispanics first entered the tables in 1972, making up 1.1% of the USA's poor in that year. By 1996, Hispanics made up 2.7% of the nation's poor - almost equivalent to the Black figure. (18)
  • Forbes Magazine identified the leap in Hispanic poverty rates as being dueto their numbers being "fed by immigration." (19)
  • According to the US Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, March 2001, some 22.1% of Blacks were below the official poverty line. This compares with 21.2% of Hispanics; 10.8% of Asians and Pacific Islanders; and 7.5% of White non-Hispanics. (20)
  • According to the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Institute for the Elderly in New York, about 23.8% of elderly Hispanics in the United States live in poverty, with no prospects of improvement in their situation. (21) 
  • In 1997, 25% of all children in California were living below the poverty line. (24)  
  • The number of children living in poverty in California had increased by more than 3% from 1990 to 1997. (25) 
  • In the Appalachia, Mississippi Delta, Black Hills, and Los Angeles areas, more than 30% of Hispanics are below the poverty line. (28) 
  • According to a survey by the University of California at San Francisco and the Field Institute, Latinos are 13 times more likely to be part of the working poor -- defined in the survey as a family off our earning less than $20,000. (29) 
  • Denver's five poorest neighborhoods are populated mostly by Hispanics that only speak Spanish, particularly in the northern part of the city. (31)  In these neighborhoods, 80% of the children receive food coupons, and are responsible for 37% of the city's crime rate. (32) 
  • The number of people in poverty living in immigrant households in Arizona has nearly tripled to 330,000 from 113,000 during the 1990s. During that same time, immigrant households rose to 41%, from 20% of the total of poverty-level households. (35) 
  • In 1996, according to the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1.2 million newcomers joined the US population - yet fewer than 5% were admitted because of their job skills. (36) Most of the rest were allowed in because they were relatives of US citizens or other immigrants or were refugees, and a quarter of the total were illegal immigrants. (37)
  • During the 1990s, more than 1.3 million people with less than a high school education entered the USA. (38) Ofthose who arrived in this decade, 34.4% were school dropouts. (39) 
  • In 1998, nearly 40% of immigrants had less than a high school education - double the share for natives, according to the 1990 census figures. The gap widens when grade school education is considered. Some 23% of immigrants have less than nine years of education,compared with just 4% of Americans. (40) 
  • Only 8% of California Latinos have a bachelor's degree or higher, compared with 43% of Asians, 33% of whites and 24% of African Americans, according to the California Research Bureau. (42) 
  • Latinos in California have the highest high school dropout rate (45%), lowest college graduation rate (8%) and, not surprisingly, the lowest median income ($14,560). (45)
  •  The Latino education gap in California is not new. Previous studies showthe same was true as far back as the 1940s. (46) 
  • The high school dropout rate in most Latin American countries exceeds 50%. (48) 
  • Mexico, for example, has an illiteracy rate in excess of 10%, and Guatemala has an illiteracy rate of over 40%. (49) 
  • Median household income in the New York areas of Queens, Brooklyn, Suffolk, Fairfield, favored by immigrants, dropped between 1989 and 1998. This was also the case in many other countiesacross the nation that experienced a large influx of immigrants, according to census data. (50) 
  • The data show that in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx - counties with a major increase of immigrants - median income fell sharply. (51)  In Queens, according to the data, the median household income fell from $44,938 in 1989, to $36,480 in 1998, a drop of nearly 19%, while in Brooklyn it fell by 18%, from $33,762 to $27,556. (52) 
  • Median income also fell in many counties in other states attractive to immigrants, including Los Angeles County and Miami-Dade County. (53)  In Los Angeles County, where there has been a surge of immigrants from Mexico, median income fell in constant dollars from $45,962 in 1989 to $37,655 in 1998, a decline of 18%. (54) 

EVERY 100 MANUAL LABOR IMMIGRANT JOBS CREATE 139 EXTRA POVERTY CASES

  • A study of 65 rural communities in California's San Joaquin Valley between 1980 and 1990, found that the addition of 100 farm jobs resulted in an additional 139 people - including immigrants, their families and area residents - living in poverty. (59) This statistic is driven by the low wages paid to the farm worker, who inturn is then unable to support dependents, creating the social welfare problem.
  • A Rand study looked at the nine million net new jobs created in California from 1960 to 1990. It found that three-fourths of the new jobs were filled by workers with at least some college education, and almost all of the rest were filled by high school graduates. (62)
  • Furthermore, the share filled by workers with some college education has risen over the years, the Rand study found. By the 1980s, some 96% of net new jobs were filled by such workers. (63) 
  • According to a survey by the University of California at San Francisco and the Field Institute, Latinos are much less likely to benefit from the state's explosion in job growth because they are less likely to finish high school or attend college. (64) 
  • According to the survey, 56% of the state's Latinos had an education level of high school or lower, compared to 28% of blacks, 14% of whites, and 11% of Asians. (65) 

THIRD WORLD IMMIGRANT CRIMINALS FILL UP 25% OF FEDERAL PRISONS

  • Criminal immigrants account for more than 25% of all inmates in federal prisons and is the fastest growing segment of the prison population. (66) 
  • The federal prison population of non-citizens has increased by about 15% per year from the mid-1980s to the present. Upkeep for each prisoner costs the taxpayers $21,300 per year. (67) 
  • Some 80% of cocaine and 50% of heroin in the US is smuggled across the border by Mexican nationals. (68) Taxpayers pay half-a-billion dollars per year incarcerating illegal alien criminals. (69)
  • In 1994, the state of Florida sued the federal government, seeking reimbursement for the $884 million a year the state spends on services to illegal aliens. Florida spent $27.6 million in 1993 to arrest, try and jail illegal immigrants charged with crimes in that state alone. (70) 
  • In addition, state and local authorities were spending more than $500 million a year to arrest and imprison illegal immigrants who committed serious crimes. (71)  New YorkState estimated these added costs at $270 million, while Illinois estimated that it spends $40 million per year for incarceration alone. (72) 
  • The demand for falsified documents in southern and coastal states has created a thriving underworld industry in counterfeiting, thievery, and forgery. For as little as $40 per person,illegal aliens can purchase documents that provide them with entitlement to health care, welfare, and work privileges. (73) 
  • According to an April 1997 report from the Associated Press, more than 180,000 aliens were granted US citizenship in 1996 without the mandatory criminal background checks. (74) 
  • An Associated Press report in February 1997, said the Citizenship USA project, pushed by the White House in 1996 to expedite admission of 1.3 million aliens, allowed as many as 130,000 criminals into the USA from Mexico, South America, and the Caribbean. (75) 

THIRD WORLD IMMIGRANT UNEMPLOYMENT

  • According to the Urban Institute, the highest rates of welfare dependency are in the agricultural counties of California, where unemployment rates are also high. In the heart of California's San Joaquin Valley, for example, 29% of the residents of Fresno (761,000 population), 30% of Merced (199,000) and 25% of Tulare (362,000) county residents were on public assistance in 1996. At the same time, unemployment rates were in double digits, even in the peak spring and summer months. (77) 
  • If it were a state -- and with 3 million residents, its population rivals Oregon's -- the Valley would have the nation's worst economy. Unemployment averages out at 12.4% for the entire region, nearly twice as high as West Virginia's. (78)
  • In South Central Los Angeles - another high-density immigrant center - the unemployment rate hovers around 20% (four times the state average) and the poverty rate is 40%. This figure has risen consistently over the last ten years. (82)

THIRD WORLD IMMIGRATION'S EFFECT ON THE USA LABOR MARKET

  • An estimated 1,880,000 American workers are displaced from their jobs every year by immigration; the cost for providing welfare and assistance to these Americans is over $15 billion a year. (83) 
  • It is estimated that between 40 and 50% of wage-loss among low-skilled Americans is due to the immigration of low-skilled workers. (84) 

THIRD WORLD IMMIGRANT WELFARE USAGE

  • The proportion of immigrant households using welfare programs is estimated by the Center for Immigration Studies to be between 30% to 50% higher than that of US-born citizens. (85) 
  • According to the ‘Immigrants and Welfare, Research Perspectives on Migration' report released by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace -- International Migration Policy Project, immigrant use of welfare has been rising, regardless of how "immigrant" and "welfare" are defined. (86) 
  • Immigrants in California are three times more likely to receive welfare than native-born residents, a dramatic difference that is not seen in other states with burgeoning immigrant populations, according to a report by the US General Accounting Office. (87)
  • Forty-six% of California's children live in families with incomes low enough to qualify for subsidized school meals ($29,000 or less annually for a family of four). Child-care costs, averaging $407 monthly for a preschooler, amount to one-half the earnings of a full-time, minimum-wage worker. (88) 
  • Over 60% of Hispanic households in the Alexandria, Virginia area, receive assistance from federal or state programs for low-income residents. Forty-four% of Hispanic families get subsidized school lunches for their children. (89) 
  • Bearing in mind that about 37% of immigrants in Phoenix, Arizona, and 36% statewide fall below the poverty level, (90) the news that the number of people living below the federal poverty level in that state, soared nearly 90% since 1989, should come as no surprise.The state population grew about 30% in that time. (91) 

HEALTHCARE BURDEN

  • Immigrants who arrived in the US after 1989 and their US-born children account for 60% or 5.5 million of the increase in the size of the uninsured medical health population. (92) 
  • The low health insurance rate means that these Third World immigrants show up at the emergency rooms of America's hospitals because they cannot afford medical care.
  • Dozens of hospitals in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California, have been forced to close or face bankruptcy because of federally-mandated programs requiring free emergency room services to illegal aliens. (93) 
  • In a recent year in Colorado, the state's emergency Medicaid program paid an estimated $30 million in hospital and physician delivery costs for about 6,000 illegal immigrant mothers - an average of $5,000 per baby. Those 6,000 births to illegal aliens represent 40% of the births paid for by Medicaid in Colorado. Those 6,000 babies immediately became US citizens and qualified for full Medicaid services, with a cost yet to be tabulated. (94) 
  • In addition to general welfare, the GAO -- the investigative arm of Congress -- has documented similar differences in the use of Medicaid, the nation's health insurance program for the needy. In California, for instance, the number of citizens naturalized in fiscal years 1996 and 1997 receiving Medi-Cal (California's Medicaid program) was 23.7%, compared with 8.2% for native-born citizens. (95) 

THE FINANCIAL BURDEN OF THIRD WORLD IMMIGRATION

  • The net annual cost of immigration has been estimated at between $67 and $87 billion a year. The National Academy of Sciences found that the net fiscal drain on American taxpayers is between $166 and $226 a year per native household. Even studies claiming some modest overall gain for the economy from immigration ($1 to $10 billion a year) have found that it is outweighed by the fiscal cost ($15 to $20 billion a year) to native taxpayers. (96) 
  • The net deficit is caused by a low level of tax payments by immigrants, because they are disproportionately low-skilled and thus earn low wages, and a higher rate of consumption of government services, both because of their relative poverty and their higher fertility. (97) 
  • The federal government currently provides targeted services to migrant and seasonal farm workers and their dependents that cost about $600 million per year, equivalent to ten% of these workers annual earnings. (98)
  • According to the ‘Immigrants and Welfare, Research Perspectives on Migration' report released by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace -- International Migration Policy Project, approximately 1.4 million immigrants receive AFDC or SSI payments totaling $4.5 billion annually. (99)
  • Their average monthly AFDC payment is $133; their average SSI payment is $407. Estimates using a more broadly defined package of benefits and counting benefits from state and local as well as federal sources indicate that immigrants receive approximately $25 billion annually in assistance benefits. (100) 

IMMIGRATION'S IMPACT AND COST ON PUBLIC SCHOOLS

  • The USA's public schools are already overcrowded with six million more children in schools today than in the late 1980s. (101) In 2002, school attendance rose from the 1997 level of 50 million students in primary and secondary education to more than 55 million - directly as a result of immigration. (102) 
  • The Urban Institute estimates that the cost of educating illegal alien children in the nation's seven states with the highest concentration of illegal aliens was $3.1 billion in 1993 (which,with the growth of their population to 1.3 million, was more than $5 billion in 2000). This estimate does not take into account the additional costs of bilingual education or other special educational needs. (104) 
  • The Carrying Capacity Network, a non-profit group that studies growth and environmental issues, estimated in 1994 that legal and illegal immigrants have cost Florida $3.3 billion since 1970. (105) 
  • In California, the already mentioned cause and effect of a one-person increase in farm employment creating a 0.67-person increase in welfare use, means an additional annual welfare cost of $954 per farm job. (106)
  • Since farm workers in California in 1990 earned an average $7,320, each farm job was associated with a welfare payment equivalent to approximately 13% of average farm earnings. (107) 
  • The costs of illegal immigration in terms of government expenditures for education, criminal justice, and emergency medical care are significant. California has estimated that the net cost to the state of providing government services to illegal immigrants approached $3 billion during a single fiscal year. (108) 
  • Stretched to the limit by these burdensome costs, the state of California sued the federal government in 1993 for $10.5 billion to recover the costs of education, health care, policing, and other administrative services for legal and illegal immigration. (109)

ASIAN IMMIGRATION MYTHS It is often thought that Asian immigration to the USA does not fall into these damning statistical breakdowns. While it is true that Asian immigrants to the USA fare on average better than immigrants from other parts of the Third World, it is a myth that all is well with the Asian immigrant community.

  • According to the March 2001 US Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, some 10.8% of Asians and Pacific Islanders were below the official poverty line. (110)
  • In 1993, a study that showed that despite a ‘model minority' stereotypical image of being self-sufficient, 55% of elderly Chinese immigrants in California received public assistance, mostlySupplemental Security Income. (111) 
  • Among elderly Vietnamese immigrants, the figure was 74%, compared with 21% of Mexican immigrants and nine% of the native-born elderly. (112) 
  • Arrest rates for American Asians are higher than Whites for gambling, gangsterism and youth homicide. Asians make up half of all gang arrests in Seattle, and their gang rate relative to population increased to nearly even with Blacks in the city by 1994. A 1992 Los Angeles study showed that Asians are 13 times more likely than Whites to be members of gangs. (113)
  • Nationally, Asian poverty is slightly worse than the White average. Asian poverty rates in some urban areas are equal to, or worse, than blacks. Asian poverty in many census tracts ranges in the ghetto definition range, from 40% up to 70%. Asian per capita income is often comparable or worse than Blacks in urban areas. In San Francisco, Asian poverty rates are equal to those of Blacks for the equivalent family structure. (114) 

CONCLUSION - A THREAT TO THE FABRIC OF AMERICAN SOCIETY

  • It is thus clear that Third World immigration to the USA brings none of the supposed benefits that the pro-immigration lobby suggests. The truth is that Third World immigrants do not bring skills,prosperity, stability, or economic growth.
  • On the contrary: they bring with them serious social problems that are then borne by native-born Americans, both financially and socially.
  • Third World immigration threatens the very fabric of society, and unless halted, will see the final dissolution of the American Republic.

Next Section: About The Author

Previous Section: More Information